New measurement service gauges ad effectiveness in a DVR world

The very thought of digital video recorders (DVRs) has kept advertisers walking the floors at night and shaking their fists at a device with the potential to take commercial avoidance to a whole level. Will they or won't they see my ad? If they do, will it have the desired effect?

The very thought of digital video recorders (DVRs) has kept advertisers walking the floors at night and shaking their fists at a device with the potential to take commercial avoidance to a whole level. Will they or won’t they see my ad? If they do, will it have the desired effect?

Chicago-based Information Resources Inc. wants national U.S. advertisers to sleep easier knowing that its new IRI BehaviorScan DVR Service is on the job.

IRI worked with TiVo and licensed its audience research data to develop the system to measure ad effectiveness among households with DVRs. It also has the support of a consortium of national consumer packaged goods marketers.

The system uses IRI’s BehaviorScan in-marketing testing service to analyze the purchasing behaviour in the panel households, which are being supplied with TiVo DVRs. This data will then be compared with households without the TiVo service.

In the same market, existing BehaviorScan panel homes will be provided TiVo DVRs to track their viewing behaviour in order to form the basis for comparison.

BehaviorScan DVR will allow marketers to quantify the impact of DVRs on ad effectiveness and brand and category sales; understand the differences between TiVo and non-TiVo homes; and adapt their media plans and ad creative according to direct insight of TiVo ownership, ad exposure conditions, and brand performance.

The BehaviorScan DVR Service is available now.

In other DVR measurement news, Nielsen Media Research has confirmed that spring 2005 is the target for beginning to report TV program ratings in DVR households in the U.S. The planned method for gathering the data is rather low-tech – paper diaries.

Although Nielsen meters are able to identify DVR playback on a daily basis, eight-day diaries will be used to report playback of recorded programs. NMR will then issue weekly revised ratings that include both live and DVR viewing.

Forrester Research estimates DVR penetration in the U.S. will reach 41% by 2009.