NADbank 2004: Post continues decline, Globe stays stable

The NADbank 2004 study (www.nadbank.com) reports good news for newspapers overall. The number of Canadians who read daily papers (11,793,500 weekly in 2004) has remained fairly constant since 1999, although increasingly some of that readership is moving to the online versions and the free daily papers. The free dailies continue to eat into the readership pie. In Toronto, they accounted for 25% of newspaper readers in the market in 2004, up from 19% the previous year. Montreal readership jumped to 20% in 2004 from 17% in 2003.

The NADbank 2004 study (www.nadbank.com) reports good news for newspapers overall. The number of Canadians who read daily papers (11,793,500 weekly in 2004) has remained fairly constant since 1999, although increasingly some of that readership is moving to the online versions and the free daily papers.

The free dailies continue to eat into the readership pie. In Toronto, they accounted for 25% of newspaper readers in the market in 2004, up from 19% the previous year. Montreal readership jumped to 20% in 2004 from 17% in 2003.

Online newspaper readership also showed increased share of readers in 2004 over 2003: Toronto 20% from 16%; Montreal 13% from 11%; Vancouver 16% from 13%; Ottawa-Gatineau 22% from 21%; Calgary 17% from 16%; Victoria 15% from 13%; Halifax 17% from 16%; and Quebec City unchanged at 9%.

On the national newspaper front, the National Post experienced another decline. Average weekday readership for the Post in 2004 was 585,300, down 7.8% from the previous year. The ‘Read Saturday’ score for the Post dropped 1.7% to 611,900 in 2004.

Nationally, the Globe and Mail showed more stability with a 1.3% decline to 937,200 average weekday readership in 2004. The Globe‘s Saturday readership rose about 4.4% to 1,086,800 last year.

Demographically, adults who read newspapers are 54% male, 46% female. There is not much difference between age groups with 50 to 65 year-olds the largest at 82% but the others are not far behind: 18-24, 78%; 25-34, 76%; 35-49, 79%; and 65+, 79%.

When it comes to education there is a slight gap between average daily readership of those with some high school, 46%, and university grads, 58%. Readership for high school grads and those with some post-secondary stands at 52%.

Although occupation doesn’t seem to be a factor in newspaper readership, income is. The make up of weekday readers by household income is $100K+, 62%; $75K to $100K, 57%; $50K to $75K, 53; $30K to $50K, 51%; $20K to $30K, 48%; and $20K or less, 39%.

Looking at the two markets with the most competition, the local papers were in control in the Toronto market and the standing amongst the contenders in Montreal remains unchanged.